funics

Did you said Soul Jazz?

In Bio on January 26, 2009 at 11:01 am

jazzsoulSoul jazz was a development of hard bop which incorporated strong influences from blues, gospel and rhythm and blues in music for small groups, often the organ trio which featured the Hammond organ. Important soul jazz organists included Bill Doggett, Charles Earland, Richard “Groove” Holmes, Les McCann, “Brother” Jack McDuff, Jimmy McGriff, Lonnie Smith, Big John Patton, Don Patterson, Shirley Scott, Hank Marr, Reuben Wilson, Jimmy Smith and Johnny Hammond Smith.

Tenor saxophone and guitar were also important in soul jazz; soul jazz tenors include Gene Ammons, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Eddie Harris, Houston Person, and Stanley Turrentine; guitarists include Grant Green and George Benson. Other important contributors were Alto saxophonists Lou Donaldson and Hank Crawford, trumpeter Blue Mitchell, and drummer Idris Muhammed (ne Leo Morris). Unlike hard bop, soul jazz generally emphasized repetitive grooves, melodies, and melodic hooks.

Soul jazz was developed in the late 1950s, reaching public awareness with the release of The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco, and was perhaps most popular in the mid-to-late 1960s, though many soul jazz performers, and elements of the music, remain popular. Although the term “soul jazz” contains the word “soul,” soul jazz is only a distant cousin to soul music, in that soul developed from gospel and R&B rather than from jazz.

souljazzindustrySome well-known soul jazz recordings are Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder (1963), Herbie Hancock’s Cantaloupe Island (1964) (which was popularized further when sampled by US3 on Cantaloop), Horace Silver’s Song for My Father (1964) (which was musically alluded to by Steely Dan with Rikki Don’t Lose That Number), Ramsey Lewis’sThe In Crowd (1965), and Cannonball Adderley’s Mercy, Mercy, Mercy (1966) (also popularized further when covered as a top 40 pop song by The Buckinghams).

The Soul Jazz vernacular was a major contributer to the evolution of Jazz-Funk in the 1970s.

 

Soul jazz  

  • Origins: hard bop, rhythm and blues, blues, gospel
  • Cultural origins: 1950s
  • Typical instruments: 
    • Hammond organ, piano, saxophone, guitar, 
    • double bass, electric bass, drums
  • Mainstream popularity: 1950s to 1970s
  • Subgenres: Jazz-funk

List of Soul Jazz musiciens

  • Cannonball Adderley – sax
  • Nat Adderley – cornet
  • Gene Ammons – sax
  • Curtis Amy – sax
  • Roy Ayers – vibraphone
  • Joe Beck – guitar
  • George Benson – guitar, vocals
  • Lou Blackburn – trombone
  • Billy Butler (guitarist)
  • Earl Bostic – sax
  • George Braith – sax
  • Zachary Breaux – guitar
  • Bobby Broom – guitar
  • Norman Brown (guitarist) – guitar
  • Ray Bryant – piano
  • Rusty Bryant
  • Kenny Burrell – guitar
  • Billy Butler (guitarist) – guitar
  • Arnett Cobb – sax
  • Sonny Cox – sax
  • Hank Crawford – sax
  • The Crusaders
  • King Curtis
  • Eddie Davis (saxophonist) – sax
  • Joey DeFrancesco – organ, trumpet
  • Monica Dillon
  • Bill Doggett
  • Lou Donaldson – sax
  • Cornell Dupree
  • Charles Earland
  • İlhan Erşahin – sax
  • Wilton Felder
  • Ronnie Foster
  • George Freeman
  • Funk, Inc.
  • Maynard Ferguson – trumpet
  • Grant Green – guitar
  • Jabari Grover – Vocals
  • Herbie Hancock
  • Eddie Harris
  • Gene Harris
  • Bill Heid
  • Wayne Henderson (musician)
  • Red Holloway – saxophone
  • Ron Holloway – tenor saxophone
  • Richard Holmes (organist) – organ
  • Stix Hooper
  • Freddie Hubbard – trumpet
  • Bobbi Humphrey – flute
  • Fred Jackson (saxophonist) – sax
  • Willis Jackson (saxophonist) – sax
  • The J.B.’s
  • Henry Johnson (guitarist)
  • Plas Johnson
  • Wayne Johnson – guitar
  • Ivan “Boogaloo Joe” Jones – guitar
  • Ronny Jordan – guitar
  • Rahsaan Roland Kirk
  • Earl Klugh – guitar
  • Charles Kynard
  • Ramsey Lewis – piano
  • Bobby Lyle – piano
  • Johnny Lytle
  • Harold Mabern – piano
  • Junior Mance – piano
  • Herbie Mann – sax, flute
  • Hank Marr – organ
  • Pat Martino – guitar
  • Hugh Masekela – trumpet
  • Les McCann – piano
  • Big Jay McNeely sax
  • Wes Montgomery – guitar
  • Dick Morrissey – tenor/soprano sax
  • Ronald Muldrow – guitar
  • Jack McDuff – organ
  • Jimmy McGriff – organ
  • Lee Morgan – trumpet
  • Idris Muhammad – drums
  • Ronald Muldrow – guitar
  • Oliver Nelson – sax
  • David Newman (jazz musician) – sax
  • Johnny O’Neal
  • Maceo Parker – sax
  • John Patton (musician) – organ
  • Duke Pearson – piano
  • Houston Person – sax
  • Sonny Phillips
  • Trudy Pitts
  • Jimmy Ponder
  • Seldon Powell – sax, flute
  • Pucho & His Latin Soul Brothers
  • Bernard Purdie
  • Ike Quebec – sax
  • Chuck Rainey
  • Joshua Redman – sax
  • Freddie Roach (organist) – organ
  • Joe Sample – piano
  • Marlon Saunders – vocals
  • Rhoda Scott – organ
  • Shirley Scott – organ
  • Horace Silver – piano
  • Nina Simone – vocals
  • Dr. Lonnie Smith – organ
  • Jimmy Smith (musician) – organ
  • Johnny “Hammond” Smith – organ
  • Melvin Sparks – guitar
  • Leon Spencer – organ
  • B.B. Reed – sax
  • Grady Tate – drums
  • Billy Taylor – piano
  • The Three Souls
  • The Three Sounds
  • Bobby Timmons – piano
  • Stanley Turrentine – sax
  • James Ulmer
  • Harold Vick – sax, flute
  • Jr. Walker & the All Stars
  • Winston Walls
  • Grover Washington, Jr. – sax
  • Mark Whitfield – guitar
  • Don Wilkerson
  • Baby Face Willette – organ
  • Jack Wilson (jazz pianist) – piano
  • Reuben Wilson
  • John Wright – piano
  • Larry Young (jazz) – organ
  • Joe Zawinul – keyboards

 

 

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