funics

Dippin’s – Hank Mobley

In Album, Recado Bossa Nova on June 24, 2009 at 1:45 pm

Hank Mobley – Album: Dippin’
Recording Date: Jun 18, 1965
Label: Blue Note

Titles:

  1. The Dip 7:57dippin
  2. Recado Bossa Nova 8:11
  3. The Break Through 5:52
  4. The Vamp 8:21
  5. I See Your Face Before Me 5:29
  6. Ballin’ 6:51

Personel: Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone); Lee Morgan (trumpet); Harold Mabern (piano); Larry Ridley (bass); Billy Higgins (drums).

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey on June 18, 1965. Includes liner notes by Ira Gitler. Liner Note Author: Bob Blumenthal. Recording information: Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1965).

Review cduniverse:
With DIPPIN’, Hank Mobley is clearly entrenched in his “hard” period, as his more muscular, yet still round, tone and his penchant for funky grooves dominate the session. As on many other Mobley sides, Lee Morgan and Billy Higgins return to lend their respective touches, which once started the flame burning with Morgan’s “The Sidewinder.” Pianist Harold Mabern and bassist Larry Ridley round out the group. It is Mobley, however, who blows strongest here, strengthened by a long string of powerful dates like this one.

Like most post-“Sidewinder” Blue Note dates, DIPPIN’ kicks off with a near-rip-off of the popular Morgan hit from 1963. Here, “The Dip” satisfies the requisite funkiness with a spirited quasi-Latin beat from Higgins and a Horace Silver-esque melody. The following “Recado Bossa Nova,” one of the session’s most memorable cuts, captures the Brazilian style that caused such a stir with equal amounts of taste and bluesy grunge. Later, the date’s only ballad, the classic “I See Your Face Before Me,” offers a respite with one of Mobley’s smokiest performances on record. Finally, the closer “Ballin'” is a joyous waltz that ends the session on a swinging blast.

Review Thom Jurek, AMG:
Dippin’ is one of Hank Mobley’s finer moments, even considering that his entire Blue Note catalog is masterful, particularly his 1960s dates that reveal the depth and dimension of his understanding of harmonic invention — all in the name of groove and swing, of course. This date, recorded on a single day in June of 1965, netted four Mobley originals as well as two covers. The band included trumpeter Lee Morgan, pianist Harold Mabern, bassist Larry Ridley, and drummer Billy Higgins. The two-horn front line always served Mobley well. Here, with Morgan, the groove commences from the first notes of the title cut that opens the set. The short bluesy lines burst from the horns, and are turned inside out with elegant yet knotty lines that move the tune almost into pop territory but never venture far from the blues. The sprightly “Recado Bossa Nova,” written by Djalma Ferreira, moves the band outside its comfort zone rhythmically, but Mobley’s horn chart is brilliant. Higgins and Ridley keep the bossa groove natural and steaming as the soloists begin taking the tune apart and putting it back together. There is one ballad on the set, “I See Your Face Before Me” composed by Arthur Schwartz and Howard Dietz. On it, Mobley does his best Ben Webster, blowing low and smoky and sweet, but the truth is that it doesn’t belong on a program with so many hard bop swingers. The rest of the session is a pure joy and a fine document of Mobley’s abilities as a bandleader and composer. The 2006 Rudy Van Gelder Edition on CD features spectacular sound, but contains no bonus material.

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